In the early days of aviation, rotary aircraft engines were used extensively, especially during WWI. These powerplants were particularly unique in that their lack of conventional reciprocating elements provided smooth operation. You may ask yourself: “How does a rotary engine work without moving parts?” To answer this, we will outline how rotary engines produce power and how they differ from other engine types.


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Aircraft ignition systems rely on similar instruments to what you would find in an automobile. Both are internal combustion engines that use spark plugs and some type of fuel monitoring network related to throttle position. However, rather than relying on a battery, planes employ a dual magneto model or self-contained electrical impulses to ignite the spark plugs and start their engines. In this article, you can read more about how aircraft ignition systems work, and gain a better understanding of whatever plane you are working with.


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Made to be vibrant in color to be highly identifiable, emergency stop switches and buttons are essential for the safety they provide to operators using machinery, especially during instances of misuse or an accident. Serving as a fail-safe mechanism when equipment cannot be shut off in its typical manner, these devices come in many forms and are often applied to machines among public, commercial, and industrial facilities.


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The aircraft's fuel system is responsible for delivering a continuous flow of fuel to the aircraft's engines throughout the duration of a flight. In terms of complexity and importance, few aircraft elements place higher than the fuel system. Although not homogenous in their design, the difference in fuel systems between two aircraft of the same class are generally composed of similar parts. In order to provide a better understanding of fuel systems, this blog will discuss their most important components and the function that each performs.


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One of the first major challenges to overcome in aviation was the ability for the aircraft to land and come to a complete stop in a short distance. Over the years, the need for a more robust landing system has become more pronounced due to the increased airspeed and weight of modern aircraft. Today, the landing system comprises thrust reversers and brakes, both of which are redundant and used simultaneously to stop the plane. In this blog, we will discuss everything you need to know about the aircraft landing system, highlighting details about thrust reversers and braking systems.


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Check valves have several other names, such as one-way, non-return, or clack valves. They have a design that is used for the guarantee of unidirectional flow. With this, they are often used as a preventive measure to avoid overflow, backflow, and other hazardous operating conditions. As such, they are found in a wide variety of fluid handling systems. A few check valve applications are irrigation systems, oil and gas extraction and processing equipment, potable water systems, standard and critical power generation and distribution equipment, subsea operation systems, wastewater treatment facilities, and more.


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Aircraft are robust and advanced vehicles, yet just like an automobile, they require regular inspections and maintenance to ensure that all systems and parts are airworthy and functioning as intended. As required by the FAA, aircraft must undergo a series of inspections, each of which vary in their thoroughness and objective. To help you better understand the basic inspection requirements of an aircraft, we will discuss common aircraft inspections in brief detail.


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Since the dawn of aircraft travel, navigation-based systems have been one of the most important features within aircraft, allowing pilots to traverse the sky with ease. Equipped with a number of instruments that enable pilots to navigate large and small aircraft alike, this blog will cover two of the most important types. The first instrument is the Course Deviation Indicator (CDI), and the second is the Omnibearing Selector (OBS).


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While floating down a runway may not sound like a problem, it is for pilots and aircrew alike. Whether you are a pilot with years of experience or a rookie flier, floating down past your touchdown point is a problem all pilots face at some time or another. In this blog, we will be providing a brief overview of what floating down the runway entails, how to prevent it, and how to stop it if you find yourself in this predicament.


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As piston aircraft engines operate through the combustion of fuel-and-air mixtures, a great amount of heat is generated over time which can pose hazards to surrounding components if left alone. While many piston aircraft utilize the flow of air to cool down many internal components, the general assembly of such aircraft engines will often deter equal cooling to all cylinders. In order to achieve more uniform cooling to mitigate the formation of hotspots, most air-cooled piston engines utilize structures known as cowling and baffles.


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