The aircraft hydraulic system is an integral part of any aircraft for the movement and actuation of various hydraulic systems. For a typical aircraft, these often include systems and equipment such as aircraft wheel brakes, bay doors, handle wing flaps, and many other flight pertinent components. Even the autopilot system contains servos that are operated by hydraulic actuators, allowing manipulation of control services. Hydraulic systems work through the enacting of pressure upon enclosed fluids, then transferring that pressure throughout the system to actuate a command. Hydraulic systems are extremely reliable, efficient, and easy to maintain, making them very suitable for aircraft control. In this article, we will discuss the advantages of the hydraulic system, as well as some challenges faced in hydraulic design.


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Air, the gift of life and the gift of flight. In this article we will discuss some differences between how air is used in two types of induction systems, a carburetor system and a fuel injection system. Both of these systems are used in small aircraft and rely on a mixture of air and fuel to operate. By converting air pressure into rotational motion, thrust and lift is created and flight is achieved.


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A malfunctioning engine is never a pleasant experience for anyone no matter the vehicle. They can often create downtime to inspect and fix the problem, and this can be a much longer and harder process when the vehicle in question is an aircraft. Therefore, identifying and solving the problem of an aircraft engine that fails to start as quickly and efficiently as possible is always best.


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From the first bamboo flying toys of China in 400 BC to the modern aircraft we rely on today, the understanding of flight and propulsion has been a constant journey that we have been improving all the time. Vertical flight through aircraft propellers has been a somewhat understood concept for thousands of years, but it was not until the Wright brothers that we truly understood and put to their capabilities to the test for horizontal flight. Just like a similarly designed wing’s ability to create lift, propellers can be used to drive an aircraft forward, creating the wonders of flight that we use all around the world. In this blog, we will discuss how propellers are designed so that they may create flight.


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The function of a turbine engine inlet is to provide airflow free of distortion to the inlet of a compressor. Most engines feature inlet guide vanes to straighten the airflow and assist in directing it to the first stages of the compressor. Controlled airflow is key to avoiding compressor stalling, in which the airflow stops or direction of flow is reversed. Gas turbines consume much more air than, for example, reciprocating engines. To account for this, the entrance passage of turbine inlets are considerably larger. Additionally, the inlet has an important role in the aircraft’s performance, as failures of the inlet duct can result in significant performance deficiencies throughout other components of the engine.


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Believe it or not, flight simulators have been around for nearly 100 years. The first flight simulator was invented in 1927 by pilot and flight instructor Ed Link to imitate the feeling of flight in order to practice instrument skills while safely on the ground. Since the invention of his machine, the Link Trainer, flight simulators have markedly improved. Modern simulators are hyper-realistic, ranging from fully enclosed devices to smartphone apps to virtual reality. There has never been a better time for flight simulation technology, and here are five reasons why every pilot, novice or expert, should be taking advantage of it.


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Auxiliary power units are engines, motors, and power units that provide vehicles with energy for functions other than propulsion. They are used in larger vehicles, such as aircraft, marine vessels, and some larger land vehicles to perform tasks such as starting main engines, heating motor blocks, and charging batteries. They can provide power in electric, pneumatic, and hydraulic forms.


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While functionally and chemically similar to the gas used in automobiles, aviation fuel is  different in several important ways. Like gasoline, aviation fuel used by aircraft is made up of numerous different hydrocarbons. The longer the hydrocarbons are and the higher the molecular weight of these compounds, the more chemical parameters such as melting point or smoke point differ. Gasoline, for instance, typically has seven to eleven carbon atoms with hydrogen atoms attached, while aviation fuel ranges from twelve to fifteen carbon atoms with attached hydrogen atoms. These chemical parameters can have an enormous influence on the quality of the fuel, with one of the most important for quality control being the viscosity.


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The FAA is responsible for noise reduction policies. The FAA program, The Continuous Lower Energy Emissions and Noise (CLEEN) encourages the creation of aircraft noise reducing equipment. The program aims to achieve environmentally friendly goals for newer aircraft models, and also encourages the retrofitting of older aircraft.  


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When frigid cold weather occurs, most headlines suggest that below freezing temperatures result in grounded flights. You might be surprised to hear that aircraft actually run more efficiently in relatively cold weather—here’s why.


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