Airplane

The atmospheric conditions at the typical cruising altitude of an airliner are not at all suitable for humans. Cabins are pressurized to regulate air density at those altitudes, but what protects us from the cold? At 30,000 ft., the air temperature may be approximately -47.83 ?. Imagine flying through the sky at that temperature without a cabin or a heating system. It would not work out well. There are several systems utilized by an aircraft that provide heat to the cabin.

Fuel fired heaters are mounted or portable space-heaters that obtain fuel through piping from a fuel tank, or by tapping into an aircraft’s fuel system. There are two fans in a fuel fired heater; the first fan blows air into the combustion chamber to be ignited and the second fan blows warm air into tubing directed towards the inside of an aircraft. Fuel fired heaters require electricity and are compatible with 12-volt and 24-volt electrical systems. Gas heaters need to be vented in order to prevent them from leaking dangerous gases into the cabin.

Exhaust systems may be used as a heat source for the cabin and carburetor, and are used on most light aircraft. However, defective exhaust heating systems have a few associated risks such as carbon monoxide poisoning, a decrease in engine performance, and an increased risk of a fire. Maintenance personnel need to carefully inspect the various components of this system in order to reduce the risk of the assorted dangers.

Combustion heaters are commonly used to heat cabins in larger, more expensive aircraft. Fuel is ignited in a combustion chamber or tube and the air flowing around the tube is heated and directed to the cabin. Carbon monoxide then exits the aircraft through the heater exhaust pipe. It is unlikely for carbon monoxide poisoning to occur in this type of heater. There are safety redundancies that also stop this heater from creating other dangerous situations.

Bleed air heating systems are used on turbine-engine aircraft. Compressor bleed air is transferred to a chamber and is mixed with ambient or recirculated air— the air cools off and is then routed to the cabin for heating. There are many safety features involved in this system including temperature sensors, check valves, and engine sensors.

It’s crucial to follow any original equipment manufacturer (OEM) specifications on maintaining heating systems since they can cause various dangerous situations. The safest heating systems are combustion heaters and bleed air heating systems because of their safety components.


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cockpit-design

Though it seems inherent to include human factors in cockpit design, this notion has changed considerably since--. Today’s pilot is familiar with the presence of adjustable seats, reach envelopes, control locations, and other crucial amenities within a cockpit. This was not, however, always the case. From the U.S. Air Force to commercial jets, aircraft design was not always based on human safety and comfort.

At the dawn of its designs, cockpit layouts and infrastructure were considered incredibly unsafe. In the 1940’s, United States Air Force pilot fatalities while manning an aircraft were at a record high. At the time, and for decades to follow, the statistics used in cockpit design included only the physical measurements of a few hundred male pilots. This was also during a scientific period where personality traits were considered to be linked with physical attributes— a notion no longer deemed valid.

It wasn’t until the 1950’s, that a more reflective demographic of the pilot community was measured by the Aero Medical Laboratory at Wright Air Force Base. The results marked a new era in cockpit design and history. The findings helped advance design parameters to those used today, which are based between the 5th and 95th percentile of the average human build. These advancements have led to the inclusion of anthropometry, the science of measuring human individuals, in aviation cockpit design. It essentially includes measurements of the body when it is in movement and when it is still. The science is now a fundamental part of ergonomic design within an aircraft.

Another important human motivated innovation in cockpit design is Eye Datum, or Design Eye Reference Point (DERP). The FAA defines this as the ability to view all main cockpit instruments while maintaining a reasonable view of the outside world with minimal head movement. Identifying a design eye position is one of the first steps in the procedures used in cockpit. The modern flight deck is designed around this indispensable detail.

With these advancements in design, the modern cockpit uses a “human centered” mentality. The layout is specifically modeled on safety, comfort and organization. From display screens, to shapes and colors used, most mechanical details and parts now cater to the pilot, whomever they may be.


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Preheating your aircraft

As the winter season begins, it’s important to know how to preheat your plane. But first, you might ask, when should one preheat their airplane? Most experts say when the temperature hits below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, it's usually a good idea to preheat. But, if the temperature drops below 15 degrees Fahrenheit, you should definitely preheat. Preheating is essential to maintaining your aircraft, especially considering the parts for aircraft are very expensive— it is best to prevent unnecessary damage and fatigue. Airplane maintenance professionals say starting up a cold aircraft engine without preheating can cause up to 500 hours of wear on the piston.

The first option is to preheat through a forced air preheater. These are convenient and usually powered by some type of fast-heating fuel. However, there are a few downsides to this method. The forced air will not evenly heat up the ending which can result in the different temperatures throughout the airplane. This is potentially problematic because it may cause some parts to contract more than others and lead to more wear.

The second technique is to use an electric heater. This is the generally better option, but it must be installed onto the aircraft. The heating process begins once it is plugged into an outlet. It usually takes six hours to reach “thermal equilibrium” which is the when the engine is heated evenly all throughout.

The last and best method is at a heating hangar. This is an excellent method of preheating because the entire aircraft heats up to the same temperature, including the seats and oil, all at once! This method takes the longest at around 8 -12 hours, but it is the best method around. The only downside is they are not always available, but if you are able to get to one with a space availability, it is your best option.

Sourcing Streamlined, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, should always be your first and only stop for all your hard to find aircraft heaters. Sourcing Streamlined is the premier supplier of forced air preheaters, electric heaters, and more! Whether new or obsolete, we can help you find all the parts you need, 24/7x365. If you’re interested in a quote, email us at sales@sourcingstreamlined.com or call us at +1-763-401-8616.


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Auxiliary pwer units

If you’ve ever seen the back end of an airplane, you’ve probably noticed what looks like a large black dot or hole at the end of the fuselage. It’s the exhaust pipe for the small “extra” jet engine known as the APU. But what is an APU?

An APU, or Auxiliary Power Unit, is the small turbine engine used to provide additional electrical energy and normally used to start one of the main engines on larger airliners. APUs start the engines by generating auxiliary “bleed air” when there is no ground pneumatic source available. First, an electric motor starts the APU, once up and running, the APU generates bleed air which is routed to the pneumatic starters on the airplane’s main engines to spin the engine compressors for starting.

In addition to starting the engines, APUs are used to run aircraft systems on the ground when the main engines aren’t running and no ground electrical power is available. The APU can power things like onboard lighting, galley electrics, cockpit avionics, and environmental systems for pre-cooling and pre-heating. By negating the need to start the main engines while waiting for passengers to board, using the APU saves on fuel and money.

While most of an APU’s purpose is on the ground, in some instances the APU can be used an emergency electrical power source while the aircraft is airborne. But, in most cases, the APU is shut down before takeoff and reignited when the aircraft clears the runway after landing. It’s also not very accurate to say that the APU is an extra jet engine since the turbine exhaust from the APU is vented overboard, which doesn’t really help propel the aircraft forward.

Today, APUs are commonly found in medium-sized and larger civil and military jets, some turboprop aircraft, and a handful of military fighter jets. Smaller civilian jets like those used for private charters don’t have APUs because the extra weight can have much a more significant impact than it would on a larger jet.

Sourcing Streamlined, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, should always be your first and only stop for all your hard to find aviation and aircraft parts. From engines and cockpit instruments to APUs, our inventory has it all. If you’re interested in learning more or would like to request a quote, visit our website at www.sourcingstreamlined.com or call us at +1-763-401-8616.


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A Brief Study on Flight Simulators

Imagine flying a plane, not just being a passenger, but actively flying an aircraft 35,000 ft in the sky. For a lot of people, that would be a dream-come-true. Unfortunately, most of us will never actually get the chance, but we can simulate it.

Aircraft simulators, or flight simulators, are anything that can replicate and reproduce the experience of flying an aircraft, from games to full-sized cockpits mounted on hydraulic actuators.

Simulators go all the way back to WWI. Wartime meant that pilots had to be trained en masse and quickly to fly and operate machine guns. In 1929, the Link Trainer, with a pneumatic motion platform capable of simulating pitch, roll, and yaw, was introduced. In 1948, Curtiss-Wright introduced the first complete simulator, with no visual displays or motion but an entire working cockpit. In 1954, General Precision Inc. introduced a motion simulator with 3 degrees. By 1982, the Rediffusion Company introduced simulators with seamless displays like we are used to today.

Now, there are different types of simulators to choose from. System trainers teach how to operate various systems, cockpit procedure trainers (CPT) teach crew checks and drills, full flight simulators (FFS) teach the use of motion in all six degrees of freedom, and part task trainers (PTT) teach simple avionics equipment usage that can be upgraded and compounded on. These different types of simulators also have many different uses.

In addition to training pilots to fly, flight simulators can be used to train flight crew personnel in normal and emergency flight operating procedures, crew and resource management, and threat and error management. Simulators aren’t just good for teaching and training, they’re also used to evaluate for errors and improvements, and test technical modifications before they’re implemented. Teaching flight crew how to deal with failures and malfunctions is crucial, but to do so in a real aircraft can not only be expensive, but dangerous. As a result, flight simulators are more preferable. They save time and money while increasing safety. Using even the most expensive simulator is still only 1/40th the cost of training in a real Boeing 747.

 At Sourcing Streamlined, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we also want flight crews to be safe and prepared. So, as a premier distributor of aviation parts, we make sure to stock up on not only cockpits and actuators, but all kinds of flight actuators of the highest quality. Visit us at www.sourcingstreamlined.com to get started.


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aircraft-safety

Aviation inspection is very important as a preventable measure for minimizing potential problems. The inspection process eliminates the possibility of human error on the aircraft parts and components. Regular inspections include manual checks and visual examinations to determine the conditions of the components and aircraft parts. Maintaining the aircraft is critical to avoid any kind of failures that could be hazardous in causing an accident. The FAA, Federal Aviation Administration states regular inspecting acts as a preventative measure for maintaining and assuring “airworthiness”. The value of regularly inspecting provides a reduction in possible malfunctions, human error and operating failure because it detects minor defects and depletion at an early stage. This allows for the maintenance team to keep proper records logged to retain any history of issues that have occurred or may arise. There is also a very detailed preflight inspection which depends on aircraft and operations being conducted, this final inspection acts as a last-minute check prior to aircraft flying. In most cases, calendar inspections are common however inspections based on flight hours for scheduling is preferred.

The FAA provides guidelines for inspection of the aircraft, logbooks must be reviewed, and the entire maintenance record checked. This continuous procedure of being aware is essential in aircraft maintenance. The FAA also advises for numerous checklists which relate to each aircraft parts such as fuselage and hull, cabin and cockpit, engine and engine house, landing gear, wing and center section of aircraft, propellers, and much more. Each of these parts is checked for any possible failures and reporting of conditions. Applying each step and taking part in the due diligence of inspecting will mediate any possible issues or failures that may induce any complications.

Critical Safety Items (CSI) due to it relating to government contracts, demands more rigorous inspections because they relate to defense agencies and military services in the US. They are specific about any issues that could cause catastrophic failures, injury/death, or any accidental engine shutdowns.

Sourcing Streamlined, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, should always be your first and only stop for all your hard to find or urgent aviation component needs. Sourcing streamline is the premier supplier of engine parts, aircraft landing gear and more! Whether new, old or hard to find, they can help you locate it. Sourcing streamline has a wide selection of parts to choose from and is fully equipped with a friendly staff, so you can always find what you’re looking for, at all hours of the day. If you’re interested in obtaining a quote, contact the sales department at sales@sourcingstreamlined.com or call +1 (763) 401-8616.


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Types-of -beraings

A bearing is a component that constricts motion, thus reducing friction and handling any stress between moving parts. Bearings are used in a wide range of applications including: automobiles, airplanes, machine tools, DVD players, household appliances and more. Here are some commonly used bearings:

Sealed Precision Ball Bearings

  • Recommended for maximum rolling ease
  • Require no maintenance lubrication
  • Quiet operation
  • For medium to heavy duty loads
  • Can be for radial and thrust loads

Annular Ball Bearings

  • Provide full-length support across width of wheel
  • Quiet operation
  • For light to medium loads (up to 1200lbs per wheel)
  • Side thrust load approx. 20% of radial capacity

Flanged Ball Bearings

  • Unique design eliminates bearing and wheel seizing
  • Constructed of hardened bearing quality steel
  • Pre-greased

Caged Roller Bearing

  • High radial capacity
  • Long-wearing precision inner race
  • Some do not require usage of spanner bushings

Roller Bearings

  • Consist of a cage roller assembly and a split outer race
  • High radial capacity
  • Minimal side thrust load rating

Precision Tapered Roller Bearings

  • Designed for heavy loads and high-speed operation
  • Side thrust load rating of 60-90% radial capacity
  • Two bearings needed per wheel

Delrin Bearings

  • Durable in a wide range of temperature conditions
  • Corrosion resistant – suitable in situations where liquids are present
  • Light oil or lubrication recommended

Plastic Sleeve (Celcon) Bearings

  • Made for environments not suitable for metal bearings
  • Chemical and corrosion resistant – also suitable in situations where liquids are present
  • Light oil or lubrication recommended
  • Available in flanged or sleeve bearings

Oilite Bearings

  • Inexpensive
  • Highly efficient
  • Press-fit to wheel bore
  • Come with a “lifetime lubrication” under normal usage

Plain Bore

  • Used for light loads
  • Bore is directly on spanner bushing or caster axle, meaning ease of rolling is low

Sourcing Streamlined is the premier supplier of aviation parts.  With a continuously increasing inventory, you can be sure Sourcing Streamlined will have everything you need and more.  Sourcing Streamlined will ensure all needs are addressed in a timely and professional manner.  Sourcing Streamlined is known for having hard to find and/or out of stock parts and can always help you find cost-effective solutions.  For a quote, reach out to the main office by phone: 763-401-8616 or by email:  sales@sourcingstreamlined.com


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GSE-Tooling

A lot more than just airplanes, pilots and airline specific parts, that make sure a flight goes smoothly. You might not realize how large of a role ground support equipment, from here on out referred to as GSE, plays in getting a plane up off the ground and into the sky.

GSE can come in two main forms, the powered and the non-powered. Non-powered GSE are generally the smaller items that are used on the tarmac. These are products such as ladders, buckets, baggage carts, dollies, containers, basically anything used on the ground that would not require you to charge or add fuel to it.

When you switch over and you look at powered GSE you start to see more car like items. These are things like fueling trucks, back up generator cars, tractors, water service units. But they don’t all have to be cars and trucks. Powered GSE are also huge lights, moveable escalators and baggage belts. When you take a step back and view the whole flight of an aircraft as individual moving pieces you start to notice how important of a role the people on the ground play. Without the individuals and equipment on the tarmac, takeoffs and landings would not be as safe or efficient. But the equipment on the ground is costly and requires women and men who really know what they’re doing, to operate properly. The next time you’re at the airport, about to board a plane for a much needed vacation, take a look around at all the hundreds of people who make that flight possible.

Sourcing Streamlined, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, has a premier and expansive array of aircraft parts— with an ever-growing stock, you can count on Sourcing Streamlined to have everything you need. Sourcing Streamlined will ensure that your needs are addressed in the most expeditious and transparent manner. Sourcing Streamlined is known for having hard to find and/or out of stock parts and can always help you find what you’re looking for, all while offering cost-effective component solutions. For a quote reach out to the main office by phone +1 (763) 401-8616 or email: sales@sourcingstreamlined.com


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head-gasket

Maintaining your machinery is a key part to the longevity and performance of your engine . Despite the size of the problem and severity that the issue might display the problem must be addressed as no malfunction will fix itself. Head gaskets are the connecting piece from the cylinder block to the cylinder head that helps compact the two pieces together that distribute oil and the coolant.

Despite the non-severe issue that this might seem or cause immediately, the repercussions of not fixing it can be vital to the life of your mechanism. The issue that this would cause would be at the head of the valves causing an unwanted combustion of the piston. The piston experiences most of the critical heat that is caused by the combustion.

One of the key factors of head gasket takes part in is isolating the coolant and the oil from each other which is very vital to prevent contamination. The head gasket is a very versatile when it comes to taking the temperatures from two opposite types of chambers. Experiencing excessive heat from the combustion chambers at the same time as taking in the low temperatures of the coolant chambers. In case of a head gasket blown the coolant, pressure will drop which will cause the entire engine to overheat. Another key way that distinguishes if your gasket is blown is when is causes what is known as the mayonnaise effect (the mixture of oil and coolant).

Although the average person may not be knowledgeable in these heavy types of mechanics it is vital to know that any unusual behavior or leakage cannot be okay. Check with your local mechanic to further prevent your engine from experiencing any unwanted malfunctions.

Sourcing Streamlined has its goal all in the name. Easing your organization is our mission and providing you with an extensive variety of parts on the market. Providing gasket parts, and aircraft engine cylinder parts from some of the most well-known manufactures in the industry allows us to be a top supplier for your part needs. All our parts have been tested and placed under warranty to ensure that our orders are ensured and correct upon arrival. For an instant RFQ give us a call at +1 (763) 401-8616 or email our team at sales@sourcingstreamlined.com.


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